Letter from with heading Register subjektů is the scam letter

If you recently registered your new Czech company, you may have received this letter. Most newly registered companies The sender of the letter has heading Register subjektů- oddělení evidence právnických osob.

Most of the new registered company owners received the letter with during the May. The sender of the letter don’t mention the organization name and asks Czech company owners to pay registration and membership fee 1000 CZK

The registration office mentioned in the letter does not exist anywhere in any official public register of the Czech authorities. 

If you have already paid it or have intentions to pay it, you will face real problems!

The letter also states that the form is a partnership proposal and with your payment, you agree on all terms and conditions including automatically extended yearly services payments. So, they will keep sending you invoices each year for non existing services.

Our suggestion:

IGNORE THAT LETTER! All registration fees are already paid to Government authorities during your trade license registration and you are already registered at the public Business register.

Who can enter the Czech Republic from May 11.?

Czech republic announced the new rules of leaving and entering the country during coronavirus security measures. Not everyone can enter the Czech Republic. Only the following categories are allowed.

1- EU citizens

All EU citizens previously residing longer than 90 days in the Czech Republic (this does

not include a first entry

Conditions for entering :

 a) submission of a medical testing results certificate at entry (may be undergone on the Czech territory) + free movement limitation

within the Czech territory for 14 days after entering the Czech

Republic

 b) necessary quarantine measures after entry

Valid documents for entry (other than potential PCR test results)

temporary or permanent residence permit

OR

– confirmation of apartment ownership, lease or rent of property (or confirmation of accommodation in a dormitory)

PLUS at least one of these documents:

– health insurance card of a Czech health insurance

company – valid confirmation of study on the territory of CZ

– up-to-date confirmation from an employer proving the

duration of employment on the Czech territory is longer than 90 days

– up to date extract from the commercial, trade or similar register

2- Non – EU citizens

– all third country citizens with, as of 12. 03.2020, a permanent residence over 90 days or

a temporary residence

Conditions for entering:

 a) submission of a medical testing results certificate at entry (may be undergone on the Czech territory) + free movement limitation

within the Czech territory for 14 days after entering the Czech Republic

 b) necessary quarantine measures after entry

Valid documents for entry (other than potential PCR test results)

– temporary residence permit (long-term visa, long-term residence permit or permanent residence permit

How to arrange legal copy of original documents?

If you are applying for any type of visa in the Czech Republic, you will need to give many documents, for example, Work contact, Rental contract. Since you will not give the original one, you should make a legalized copy.

Making a legal copy of your document is easy. No need to visit the notary. You can do it at any post office. The service that you should choose is Czech Point, and it is called in Czech – Ověřování dokumentu and you should say at the window ‘potřebuje úředně ověřit listinu’.

If you want to have a document legalized, you don’t have to bring your own copy of the document: it will be copied (up to the maximum A4 format) by the post office personnel.

The cost of the post office service is about 33 kč per page. In case if you are able to leave the original documents to us, we can arrange legal copies from the post office.

Czech trade license or full-time employment?

Czech freelancer tax explanied

If you are hiring or looking for work in the Czech Republic, there are always questions regarding types of job contracts. Some companies prefer to hire someone under the Zivnostensky list while others prefer to hire people as full-time employees. Both types of employment have advantages, disadvantages, or even offer tax relief.

Czech employment taxes and taxes for freelancers

Typical full-time employee taxes, social security, and health insurance rates are higher than for Czech freelancers. To understand how this works, you must understand the three types of salaries: super-gross, gross, and clean. 

The difference between the super-gross and clean salary is 45%. Taxes, social security, and health insurance from a super-gross salary ( 34% ) are paid by the employer,  and the gross salary ( 11%) is paid by the employee. 

For example, if your clean salary is 55 000 CZK per month, then your super-gross salary is 100 000 CZK per month. Here is the detailed percentage of expenses of employee and employer:

TypeEmployer %Employee %
Health insurance9.04.5
Retirement insurance21.56.5
Employment insurance fund1.20
Sickness insurance2.30
Total34.011.0

A Czech freelancer’s tax, social, and health insurance payments are much less than the payments for full-time employees. Social tax for trade license holders is 2 544 CZK monthly, and public health insurance for trade license holders is 2 352 CZK per month.  

Czech trade license holders have a choice of different types of tax methods. Income tax is 15% from net income, and there is a 24 840 CZK tax discount for trade license employees.

The 60/40 calculation method  is the most common amongst freelancers in the Czech Republic. The collection of payment receipts or invoices from expenses is not necessary. This method means that you have a fixed  60% cost allowance and 40% income. 

For example, if your total gross income last year was 300 000 CZK,  then you calculate 300 000 – 60% cost allowance (fixed expenses) = 120 000 clean income. You will pay 15% tax on the 120 000 CZK, which calculates to 120 000 -15%= 18 000 (tax amount)- 24 840 (tax discount) = 0 CZK (final tax amount).

The advantage of hiring a freelancer with the Zivnostensky list is that the employer can completely deduct the salary payments from the taxes. At the same time, the employer can pay freelance workers a higher salary, as the employer won’t pay the  34% of tax, social security, and health insurance from the super-gross salary. Most employers offer higher salaries to freelance workers to support their social tax and health insurance payments.

After a three-month trial period, full-time employees are protected by Czech employment laws. All Czech employment taxes, social security payments, health insurance, and paperwork are then the full-time employer’s responsibility. The employee gets their clean salary after all tax deductions, and aren’t responsible for regular tax paperwork. Though full-time employees work for only one employer, they can also register a trade license for a side business, in addition to their full-time job.

Trade license holders do their own bookkeeping, pay their own social security and health insurance each month, and are responsible for calculating and filing for their annual tax refund. Unlike a traditional full-time employee, Zivno holders can have multiple partners or employers, as the work relationship between employer  and Zivnostensky list holder is more like a partnership. These contracts aren’t protected by employment law, and either side can cancel the cooperation at any time without any sanctions.

Getting mortgage, Czech maternity stay and paternity bonuses

Getting a mortgage is easier for full-time Czech employees than for Zivno holders. Most banks view full-time employees as more trustworthy, as they have a full-time job and stable income, while trade license holders can lose their work contracts or partners more easily.

Full-time employees have the right to 28 days of paid maternity leave. The amount of monthly financial support can range from 30 to 100%  of their salary from the previous 12 months. In most cases, Zivnostensky list holders don’t have the right to maternity leave, as few of them pay sickness insurance.

Czech employee card or freelancer visa?

Czech freelancer visa holders pay for their own social taxes, health insurance, and income tax.  As expats, these Zivno holders may not understand the Czech social insurance and tax system and can face some problems with late payments, wrong payments, and accrue debts on insurance. 

For that reason, visas are issued only in specific cases or when there is a high demand for freelancers within an industry, like for Native English speaking teachers with TEFL certificates. Freelancer visa holders can qualify for a different type of visa if they find full-time employment and receive an employee card, or if they begin studying and get a student visa.

The Czech employee card is the better option for Czech visa applicants who are employed full-time with their company. Their tax and insurance payments are paid by their employer, so the employee has no monthly tax responsibilities. However, it is not possible to switch your Czech employee card to a freelancer or business visa without staying in the Czech Republic continuously for five years.

Czech Zivno visa or Czech Freelancer visa

Czech freelancer visa (zivno)

Our Quick Guide to the Czech Visa Process

If you’re a non-EU citizen moving to the Czech Republic to find self-employment, you probably have heard that you will need to acquire a  long term visa. This type of visa is very common for people moving to the Czech Republic, but it can be quite confusing for people who aren’t familiar with the application process. 

Is it called a Czech Zivno visa or Czech Freelancer visa?

The long term visa is commonly referred to as a Czech freelancer visa, or Zivno visa. Typically, before you apply for your long term visa, you apply for and receive your work permit. In Czech, this work permit is called a  Zivnotensky list, hence the name “Zivno visa.”  Both of these terms, freelance visa and Zivno visa, mean the same thing.

The official, legal name is Czech long term business visa, and the purpose of stay is classified as “business.” This means that you are living in the Czech Republic to work on a freelance basis, and have a freelance work permit, which is also known as a Zivno. 

The Zivno visa is very common for TEFL trainees and English teachers from the US and other countries. Having this type of visa means that you invoice your employers each month, and are not a full-time employee for one company. 

How do I get my visa?

Your first visa application is  arranged by the Czech embassy, and the purpose of stay is the Czech trade license. 

The trade license, which you use to apply for your visa, doesn’t have the tax and commercial number, because it is completed in the following two steps:

1. Register for your Czech trade license for foreigners who don’t have a visa yet. Your trade license will be technically registered, but not activated until your Czech visa is approved. Zivno offices will register your trade license without tax number, and you then have 180 days to get your visa. You cannot legally invoice others for your services before your trade license is activated — which happens after your visa is approved. 

2. When your visa is approved and you collect your visa, you  must provide a copy of your visa to the Czech Zivno office within three days.  After that, your Zivno is activated and you can start working legally and invoicing your employers. 

During this time you should register with social tax and financial tax authorities.  If you are a US citizen, you should also register with the public health insurance office.

Renewing your visa and Zivno

The Zivnostensky list expires when your visa expires. So, it is important to extend both your visa and trade license before they expire.  The first Zivno visa is valid for up to 12 months,  after which it can be extended for another 24 months. When you apply for your visa extension, you  don’t need to go back to a Czech embassy. Visa extensions are completed in the Czech Republic at the Ministry of the Interior.

To extend your visa beyond one year, you cannot use the same bank letter you submitted for the initial visa approval. You must meet the required  income minimum to fulfill the Ministry conditions.

To avoid any issues with your visa and residency status, be sure to extend your Zivno as well as your visa and residency. If you don’t extend your trade license after your visa extension is approved and collect your biometric card, then your visa would be cancelled, because you don’t have an active trade license.

How to get a criminal clearance report?

If you want to apply for a Czech long-term visa,  get a Trade licence or register a company,  among other documents you should provide a criminal clearance report from your home country. If you are applying for a long-term visa you should also provide criminal clearance report from the country/countries in which you have resided continuously for more than 6 months in the last 3 years, or, in the absence of such a document, the applicant’s statement (Only for US citizen)  Certificates from criminal records are issued by the local police department in your home country. It should be officially translated to the Czech language and it might need an apostille or super legalization.

If you are US citizen you should make an appointment at the US embassy in the Czech Republic and sign an affidavit confirming you haven’t committed any crime. You can make an online appointment at the US embassy, they will provide the proper form to fill out and sign in person. The cost of an affidavit is 50 US $.

Need a criminal clearance report from the Czech Republic?

How do you get the 25,000 CZK government compensation for freelancers?

Czech parliament has confirmed that freelancers (živno-holders) affected by the government’s coronavirus measures qualify for a one-time payment of up to 25,000 CZK.

This one-time pay-out covers the period from 13 March to 30 April 2020. The money should be received by the end of April 2020.

This relief is for self-employed people whose workplace was closed or who could not work because of the state of emergency.

Who can get the Czech’s government’s compensation for the self-employed?

After many changes, Czech parliament has confirmed the final conditions for receiving compensation: 

1.Your trade licence must be your main source of income. 

2.You trade licence must have been activated by 12 March 2020.

3. You must declare that you were completely or partly unable to conduct your business because of the health threats associated with the coronavirus or the government emergency measures. 

4.People who receive only part of their income from their trade licence also qualify if:

a.they receive a disability or retirement pension

b.they’re on maternity or paternity leave

c.they take care of a disabled person

d.they’re preparing for their future career (students)

25,000 CZK is the maximum amount of compensation for the period from March 13 to April 30 2020. If you weren’t affected for the whole time, you can also apply for part of the period at a rate of 500 CZK a day.

You’re not eligible for this aid if you’re already receiving other social and financial support from the government.

Step-by-step guide to applying for the 25,000 CZK freelancer compensation

The easiest way to apply for the government compensation is by filling out the form online with your personal information. 

You don’t need to write a personal declaration or submit any evidence.

The website wlll generate your completed application from your personal details. 

You can find the online form here: https://ouc.financnisprava.cz/kompenzace/form/bonus

Our team has also prepared a step-by-step guide to completing the form in English:

INSTRUCTIONS

application for czech freelancers compensation step

Fill in the dates when your work activities were negatively affected by the coronavirus measures (od is the starting date and do is the end date) then click on Údaje o daňovém subjektu.

 application for czech freelancers compensation step 2.png

Now fill in your personal details. 

In the first part of the form, enter your IČ (Czech business number) and click on Doplnit dle

When you do this, the website will automatically generate your name and place of residence.

Next fill in your DIČ. Your DIČ  is your tax ID number and usually follows the format CZ+ your IČ. 

Now enter your telephone number, email address and date of birth (datum narození). Your date of birth should follow the format date-month-year.

In the Bankovní spojení section, give the details of the bank account where you want to receive the payment: 

Účet vedený u is your bank’s name. 

Číslo účtu is your bank account number.

Kód banky is your bank code.

After completing this information, click on Údaje k podání.

application for czech freelancers compensation step 1

Finally you should indicate the tax office district where you usually file your tax return. If, for example, you live in Prague 3, then choose hlavní město Prahu then Prahu 3. 

If you’re applying for yourself, then leave the answer Já osobně unchanged in the box below.

Now click on Čestné prohlášení (sworn declaration).

Check that all your details are correct, and if they are, click on Podat.

The website will automatically generate your completed application form.

You can either print the form and sign and drop it off at your local tax office or scan the signed form and send it in by email. 

The addresses of the tax office for each Prague district can be found here. 

The contact information of each tax office can be found here. 

In the subject line of your email, write Žádost o kompenzační bonus pro OSVČ,

If you apply using your databox, there’s no need to print or sign the form. Just attach the downloaded form and send it directly to your tax office…

PraguExpats really wants to help all expats in Prague at this challenging time. We hope this guide greatly simplifies the process of applying for government compensation for freelancers. Stay healthy and safe!

 

How to get a Czech criminal clearance record?

Czech criminal clearance report sample

Most Czech employers will require you to provide them with your Czech criminal record (sometimes also known as a Czech criminal clearance report or Czech criminal clearance certificate).

You’ll also need to present this document when you apply for a visa to another country. If you’ve lived in the Czech Republic and need a visa to travel to another state, then you’ll be required to provide your Czech criminal record.

Where and how do you get your Czech criminal clerance record?

You can apply for your Czech criminal record at any Czech post office using the Czechpoint service. 

To do this, you should fill out the application form. You can either submit it yourself or PraguExpats or another representative can do it for you using a power of attorney.

If you want to apply through Czechpoint, you’ll need to provide the following:

  1. Your Passport
  2. The original or an official copy of your birth certificate. This must be translated into Czech by a court-certified translator.
  3. Fee

If you don’t want to use your birth certificate, there’s another way to get your Czech criminal clearance record. You can do this at the criminal records office at Soudni 1, Prague 4.

How long does it take to arrange Czech criminal clearance report?

If you’re not an EU citizen, you should be able to get your Czech criminal clearance record on the same day you apply.

If you’re an EU citizen, it may take up to 20 days to get your Czech criminal record. EU citizens who already have their temporary residency permit and Czech birth number may be able to speed up the process..

Any other requirements?

The authorities in some countries that need your Czech criminal record may ask for additional certifications. These certifications include an apostille and super legalization

Why you need your Czech criminal clearance record?

Having your Czech criminal record is essential if you want to work for a Czech company or travel to certain countries.

If you’ve already left the Czech Republic or want to avoid the hassle of arranging for your Czech criminal record, please feel free to contact us. We can arrange for your Czech criminal record in Prague using a power of attorney so there’s no need for you to visit any government offices in person.

Types of Czech visas by the visa codes

Types of Czech visas by the visa codes

Each Czech residency or visa has a different code numbers.  The code of your visa you can find on your Czech visa sticker or on your Czech biometric card/ long-term residency. The meaning of visa codes are below:

A/VL/-/-/–;          single airport transit visa

A/VD/-/-/–;          dual airport transit visa

A/LZ/-/-/–;           service single airport transit visa

A/DZ/-/-/–;           service dual airport transit visa

C/VB/00/-/–;      single-entry visa for up to 90 days – healthcare

C/VB/01/-/–;       single-entry visa for up to 90 days – business activities

C/VB/02/-/–;      single-entry visa for up to 90 days – cultural activities

C/VB/03/-/–;       single-entry visa for up to 90 days – family or friend visit

C/VB/04/-/–;     single-entry visa for up to 90 days – invitation

C/VB/05/-/–;    single-entry visa for up to 90 days – official, political purposes

C/VB/07/-/–;      single-entry visa for up to 90 days – sports activities

C/VB/10/-/–;       single-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism

C/VB/11/-/–;      single-entry visa for up to 90 days – training (studies, scholarship)

C/VB/12/-/–;       single-entry visa for up to 90 days – transit

C/VB/27/-/–;            single-entry visa for up to 90 days – employment

C/VB/93/-/–;           single-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism ADS China

C/VB/99/-/–;                 single-entry visa for up to 90 days – other

C/VH/00/-/–;              two-entry visa for up to 90 days – healthcare

C/VH/01/-/–;               two-entry visa for up to 90 days – business activities

C/VH/02/-/–;             two-entry visa for up to 90 days – cultural activities

C/VH/03/-/–;        two-entry visa for up to 90 days – family or friend visit

C/VH/04/-/–;          two-entry visa for up to 90 days – invitation

C/VH/05/-/–;           two-entry visa for up to 90 days – official, political purposes

C/VH/07/-/–;              two-entry visa for up to 90 days – sports activities

C/VH/10/-/–;              two-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism

C/VH/11/-/–;                two-entry visa for up to 90 days – training – studies

C/VH/12/-/–;          two-entry visa for up to 90 days – transit

C/VH/27/-/–;              two-entry visa for up to 90 days – employment

C/VH/93/-/–;                  two-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism ADS China

C/VH/99/-/–;                two-entry visa for up to 90 days – other

C/VF/00/-/–;                 multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – healthcare

C/VF/01/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – business activities

C/VF/02/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – cultural activities

C/VF/03/-/–;                multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – family or friend visit

C/VF/04/-/–;                multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – invitation

C/VF/05/-/–;                 multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – official, political purposes

C/VF/07/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – sports activities

C/VF/10/-/–;                multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism

C/VF/11/-/–;               multiple-entry visa for up to 90days – training – studies

C/VF/12/-/–;                 multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – transit

C/VF/27/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – employment

C/VF/93/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – tourism ADS China

C/VF/99/-/–;                  multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days – other

C/BD/-/-/–;                    diplomatic single-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/HD/-/-/–;                 diplomatic two-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/FD/-/-/–;                 diplomatic multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/BZ/-/-/–;                   service single-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/HZ/-/-/–;                  service two-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/FZ/-/-/–;                    service multiple-entry visa for up to 90 days

C/VG/82/-/–;            visa allowing entry for the purpose of filing an application for permission to stay in order to seek temporary protection

C/VK/81/-/–;              single-entry visa for up to 90 days – declaration of the intention to apply for asylum

C/VK/83/-/–;              single-entry visa for up to 90 days – for the purpose of following the asylum procedure 

D/VC/00/-/–;               multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – healthcare

D/VC/02/-/–;               multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – cultural activities

D/VC/04/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – invitation

D/VC/05/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – official, political purposes

D/VC/06/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – business – self employment

D/VC/07/-/–;           multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – sports activities

D/VC/16/-/–,           multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Occupation (alien is a partner of business company or association member – participant in

D/VC/17/-/–,         multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Family purpose – applicant is a husband (including unmarried husband – unmarried wife,  registered partner – the same gender)

D/VC/18/-/–,       multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Family purpose – applicant is a child born in the territory of the Czech Republic

D/VC/19/-/–,              multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Family purpose – applicant is a child born outside of the Czech Republic

D/VC/20/-/–,           multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Family purpose – applicant is another family member (e.g. parent, grandparent)

D/VC/23/-/-,            multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Study – Council Regulation 2004/114/ES

D/VC/24/-/–;                  multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Study (training, scholarship) other than Council Regulation 2004/114/ES

D/VC/27/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – employment

D/VC/36/-/–,          multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Executive manager – participation on corporate body occurred according to

Act No 513/1991 Coll.

D/VC/37/WH/–;          multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – employment – working holiday of a national of New Zealand based on the Agreement on  working holiday program between the government of the Czech republic and the government of New Zealand, signed in Prague  on 11 October 2004

D/VC/94/WS/–;        multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – employment – working stay of a national of Canada based on the Agreement between the Czech Republic and Canada on facilitating the temporary working stays of youth, signed in Ottawa on 23 November 2006

D/VS/84/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for over 90 days for stay on sufferance under Section 78b of Act No 325/1999 Coll., on asylum

D/VS/85/-/–;              multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Toleration stay according to Section 58a Act No 221/2003 Coll., on temporary protection

  D/VS/91/-/–,            multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – Toleration stay according to Act No. 326/1999 Coll.

D/VC/99/-/–;            multiple-entry visa for over 90 days – other

D/VR/-/-/–;             multiple-entry visa for over 90 days in order to take possession of a residence permit

D/UD/-/-/–;            diplomatic single-entry visa for over 90 days for the purpose of applying for a long-term residence permit granted by   the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

D/UZ/-/-/–;             service single-entry visa for over 90 days for the purpose of applying for a long-term residence permit granted by the Ministry of    Foreign Affairs

R/VV/-/-/–;             Departure Order (this is not a visa)

Long-term residence permit codes by purpose of stay:

L/NE/VC/00/–;          Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – healthcare

L/NE/VC/02/–;          Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – cultural activities

L/NE/VC/04/–;          Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – invitation

L/NE/VC/05/–;          Long-Term Residence permit – third-country national – official, political purpose

L/NE/VC/06/–;         Long-Term Residence permit– third-country national – business activities – self-employment

L/NE/VC/07/–;        Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – sports activities

L/NE/VC/16/–;       Long-Term Residence permit– third-country national – employment – (the foreigner is a partner of a business company or  association member – participant in corporate body and has a work permit in corporate body in accordance with Section 89   of the Act 435/2004 Coll, on employment)

L/NE/VC/17/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – Family – applicant is husband (incl. partner and registered partner of the  same gender)

L/NE/VC/18/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – Family –  applicant is a child born in the territory of the Czech Republic

L/NE/VC/19/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – Family –  applicant is a child born outside of the Czech Republic

L/NE/VC/20/–;    Long-Term Residence permit third country national – Family –  applicant is another family member (e.g. parent, grandparent)

L/NE/VC/23/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – Study – Council Regulation No. 2004/114/EC   

L/NE/VC/24/–;    Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – Study (training, scholarship) another than Council Regulation  No. 2004/114/EC

L/NE/VC/25/–;     Long-Term Residence permit– third country national – employment – research worker – Council Regulation 2005/71/ES   

L/NE/VC/27/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – employment

L/NE/VC/36/–;    Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – executive manager – participation in corporate body established in line with the Act No. 513/1991 Coll.

L/NE/VC/91/–;    Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – toleration stay according to the Act No. 326/1999 Coll.

L/NE/VC/99/–;    Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – other

L/ER/VC/00/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – healthcare

L/ER/VC/02/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – cultural activities

L/ER/VC/04/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – invitation

L/ER/VC/05/–;     Long-Term Residence permit– third country national residing in another EU Member State – official, political purposes

L/ER/VC/06/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – business activity, self employment

L/ER/VC/07/–;    Long-Term Residence permit– third country national residing in another EU Member State – sports activities

L/ER/VC/16/–;    Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – employment (the foreigner is a    – participant in corporate body and has a work permit in corporate body   according to Section 89 of Act no. 435/2004 Coll., on employment)

L/ER/VC/17/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Family – applicant is husband (incl. partner and registered partner of the same gender)

L/ER/VC/18/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Family –  applicant is a child born  in the territory of the Czech Republic

L/ER/VC/19/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Family –  applicant is a child born  outside of the Czech Republic

L/ER/VC/20/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Family –  applicant is another family

  member (e.g. parent, grandparent)

L/ER/VC/23/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – residing in another EU Member State – Study – Council

    Regulation 2004/114/EC   

L/ER/VC/24/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Study (training, scholarship)  other than Council Regulation 2004/114/EC

L/ER/VC/25/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – employment/research worker –   Council Regulation 2005/71/EC

L/ER/VC/27/–;      Long-Term Residence permit– third country national residing in another EU Member State – employment

L/ER/VC/36/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national – residing in another EU Member State – executive manager – participation on corporate body established in line with the Act No. 513/1991 Coll.

L/ER/VC/91/–;      Long-Term Residence permit – third country national residing in another EU Member State – Toleration stay according   to Act No. 326/1999 Coll.,

L/ER/VC/99/–;     Long-Term Residence permit – third-country national residing in another EU Member State – other

Getting Czech tax residency certificate


A certificate of your Czech tax residency can help you avoid double taxation (having your income taxed twice). 

The application for the proof of Czech tax residency should be lodged at your local tax office in the Czech Republic. 

To be eligible, you must come from a country with which the Czech Republic has concluded a bilateral international double tax avoidance treaty*. Individuals and legal entities may both apply for the Czech tax residency certificate.

How to apply for Czech tax residency certificate :

You can apply for a confirmation of your Czech tax residency in three ways:

  1. In-person, 
  2. Through your databox or
  3. Through a representative who can do it for you based on a power of attorney.

Conditions 

– Your application must be written in the Czech language.

– The proof of the Czech tax residency may be issued for the date of your application form or another past date. It cannot be issued for a future date.

– The confirmation can also be issued for a completed or partial tax period in the past. In the second case, you must specify the start and ending date, e.g. from 1.1.2020 to 1.4.2020.

– You can apply using an application form from another country if that country only accepts applications that use its own form. The original form should be provided with a Czech translation.

Information needed to prove your Czech tax residency 

Information about the source of your income in the Czech Republic: e.g. employment, a business, property rental, retirement funds 

-Personal details: marital status, details of any children and their residence in the Czech Republic

-Proof of Czech residency, e.g. your residency permit or confirmation of your address (rent contract, property deed)

– Work contract, trade licence or other proof you have binding ties to the Czech Republic, e.g. the residency permit of your spouse/child or their rent contract 

Important!

The country requiring the confirmation of your Czech tax residency might require the document to be super legalized or apostilled.

Czech tax residency assistance in Prague

Want to avoid the hassles of arranging your Czech tax residency certificate on your own in Prague?

PraguExpats can take care of the entire process for you using power of attorney. Get in touch with us to find out more.